RESEARCH

Intersections Between Technology and Design

Life Cycle Analysis and Adaptive reuse
Building Materials and Embodied Energy
Net Zero and Net Impact Building Design
Design Science and Decision Making Model

NET ZERO AND NET IMPACT DESIGN

This research will to develop a set of renovation and adaptive-reuse strategies for institutional buildings in State of Maryland with the goal to achieve net zero energy consumption. Environmental impact reduction benefit of adaptive reuse will be quantified and the used as a benchmark for any future projects.

LIFE CYCLE ANALYSIS AND ADAPTIVE REUSE

This research will develop a web-based interactive tool which supports building designers in identifying and selecting preferred building materials/ assemblies and retrofit strategies with the aim of minimizing a building’s life cycle energy demand. The tool will be based on comprehensive energy performance data for a broad range of building assemblies across all US climate zones, will also reflect individual’s value choice and preference. This will provide valuable information to support decision-making relating to minimizing the life cycle energy demand of buildings.

DECISION MAKING MODEL AND INTEGRATED DESIGN PROCESS

This research explores the intersection between decision science and design and aim to develop a framework to extend the boundary of creativity. Architectural design is the process by which the designer applies intellect, creativity, and knowledge to resolve a complex array of constraints into a solution that balances the Vitruvian ideals of firmness, commodity, and delight. The traditional design approach is characterized by deterministic problem solving, generally a loosely structured, open-ended activity that includes problem definition, representation, performance evaluation, and decision-making.

EMBODIED ENERGY MAP

This project aims to develop a beta version for an embodied energy map (EEM) for the UMD college park campus. Helping people to visualize their buildings’ eco footprint could influence their perspectives about the built environment and building industry. The interactive EEM will ultimately help design professionals, policymakers, building regulators, and developers to gain a deep understanding of embodied energy and make conscious decisions to minimize a building’s life cycle energy consumption (LCEC), life cycle environmental impact (LCEI), and life cycle cost (LCC) while improving indoor environmental quality (IEQ).

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